Hall of Fame pitcher and former U.S. Senator Jim Bunning passes away at 85

james Bunning pitching in game as Philadelphia Phillie 1971

Best known around the sports world as a Hall of Fame pitcher that spent 17 years in the Majors, Jim Bunning has passed away at the age of 85.

Bunning’s son confirmed the news on Twitter.

https://mobile.twitter.com/horstmuhlmann/status/868483563406196736

The cause of death is not yet known, but there are indications that it stemmed from complications due to a stroke Bunning suffered back in October of last year.

Those who worked with Bunning in the past paid their respects to the all-time great. In addition to a Major League Baseball career that spanned three different decades with four teams, Bunning served in the United States Senate from 1999-2011, as a representative of his home state of Kentucky.

“Senator Jim Bunning led a long and storied life. From his days in the major leagues to his years as my colleague in the Senate — and the many points in between, from the City Council to the House of Representatives — Jim rarely shied away from a new adventure,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) said in a statement, via WLWT in Cincinnati. “This Hall of Famer will long be remembered for many things, including a perfect game, a larger-than-life personality, a passion for Kentucky, and a loving family. Elaine and I offer our sincere condolences to Mary and the entire Bunning family.”

On the diamond, Bunning earned nine All-Star appearances and finished his career with 224 wins as well as a solid 3.27 ERA. He finished as a runner-up in the NL Cy Young voting in 1967 after putting up 300-plus innings.

Bunning his survived by his wife, Mary Catherine Theis, nine children, 35 grand children and 14 great-grandchildren.