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Trevor Bauer’s teammates reportedly resist return to Dodgers

Jul 1, 2021; Washington, District of Columbia, USA; Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Trevor Bauer (R) talks with Dodgers manager Dave Roberts (L) in the dugout against the Washington Nationals in the third inning at Nationals Park. Mandatory Credit: Geoff Burke-USA TODAY Sports
Jul 1, 2021; Washington, District of Columbia, USA; Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Trevor Bauer (R) talks with Dodgers manager Dave Roberts (L) in the dugout against the Washington Nationals in the third inning at Nationals Park. Mandatory Credit: Geoff Burke-USA TODAY Sports

Teammates are largely against the return of Trevor Bauer to the Los Angeles Dodgers, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Bauer is currently on administrative leave as Major League Baseball investigates the allegations while a concurrent criminal sexual assault investigation is conducted by the Pasadena Police Department.

Under the league’s collectively bargained domestic violence, sexual assault, and child abuse policy, MLB can suspend and fine Bauer based on its independent findings. However, the Dodgers cannot terminate Bauer’s contract until any related suspension has been served.

Bauer receives his salary payments per usual while on leave.

The Times report on Monday cites two team sources who stated the “majority” of Bauer’s teammates don’t want him back in the clubhouse.

The high-energy and outspoken Bauer signed a three-year, $102 million deal with the Dodgers in free agency prior to this season.

MLB suspensions of players cited under the domestic violence policy have served suspensions between 13 and 162 games in length.

The alleged victim, 27, obtained an emergency restraining order. Bauer has been in court attempting to have it overturned. The next hearing, which will include witnesses, is scheduled for Aug. 2.

On July 2, investigators in the case said publicly that new leads were introduced that were expected to add “weeks” to the criminal fact-finding work.

“We were looking into some things and we thought we were nearing the end,” Lt. Carolyn Gordon told USA Today. “We are not close to the end. This investigation is bigger than we thought. So we have to look a few more places. We want to try to uncover as much stuff as we can.”

–Field Level Media