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It seems to be a pretty ridiculous premise on the surface. Russell Wilson has acted the part of an MVP candidate in each of his first seven NFL seasons. He brought the Seattle Seahawks their first ever Super Bowl title.

Why would general manager John Schneider and Co. even consider moving on from him? Despite this, we’ve seen rumors suggesting that outside factors could lead to Wilson playing in another NFL city. Meanwhile, the two sides have not started talking contract.

It’s in this that we give you a counter-argument — taking on mainstream groupthink in the process. Seattle should trade Russell Wilson this offseason.

The contract matters: Wilson is set to become a free agent after 2019 season

  • The five-time Pro Bowl quarterback is set to become a free agent after the 2019 season. If this situation drags on, it could create a Le’Veon Bell-type situation.
  • Sure Seattle could place the franchise tag on Wilson in March of 2020. But wouldn’t that be delaying the inevitable?
  • If the Seahawks have not engaged in extension negotiations with Wilson, this could mean that they are not sold on him long-term.
  • Given Wilson’s success, he’s going to want to reset the quarterback market as we know it. That means $30-plus annually on a likely five-year deal.

His style of play: As a dual-threat quarterback, Wilson’s age will be taken into account.

  • At 30 years old, how much longer can we expect Wilson to dominate with his feet? This isn’t dissimilar to running backs who hit the proverbial wall once they turn 30.
  • Wilson just put up the second-lowest rushing total of his career in 2018. He’s a great passer. But what makes Wilson special is his ability to avoid pressure.
  • What happens when Wilson can’t do that anymore? Will his game develop into one of a pocket passer? We’ve seen it happen. But will that be the case in two-to-three years?
  • There’s also thatwhole market thing. Wilson will want a five-yea deal. He’s seen quarterbacks at a similar age receive long-term security. He’s not like these other quarterbacks.

A trade would net Seattle tremendous value: Sell high and the like.

  • While the Seahawks might be hesitant to lock Wilson up on a five-year deal worth $150-plus million, other quarterback-needy teams certainly would come calling.
  • Given Wilson’s recent success (MVP candidate in 2018), his value on the trade market would be at an all-time high.
  • Teams such as the Chiefs, Eagles, Rams and Texans have given up the equivalent of multiple first-round picks to select unproven quarterbacks.
  • What is to stop a team from yielding two first-round picks and change? In turn, that could set the Seahawks up well for the future.

A move for the future: Are these Seahawks legit Super Bowl contenders?

  • Despite a playoff run last season, it’s hard to imagine these Seahawks being legit Super Bowl contenders moving forward. Heck, they lost to the Dallas Cowboys in the playoffs.
  • The likes of K.J. Wright and Frank Clark are slated for big pay days in free agency. Seattle could retain both long term by ridding itself of Wilson’s contract.
  • As we’ve seen with the likes of Earl Thomas and Richard Sherman, no one is immune to John Schneider’s forward-thinking mentality. Why do we believe Wilson is?