Boston Celtics arena TD Garden amid COVID-19 pandemic.
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Part of the process of resuming the 2019-20 NBA season amid the COVID-19 pandemic is widespread testing for players.

It’s estimated that the Association will need at least 15,000 tests to distribute to players and team personnel should the season start up again in a “bubble city.”

Though, there’s a lot more that goes into this. Antibody testing is also a big thing. It enables teams to track which players have previously had the virus, but showed no symptoms. It’s expected that a vast majority of individuals with the virus are asymptomatic.

NBA players would likely fall under this category given their average age and relative health. Testing and immunity could be a huge part of sports itself returning.

According to Jon Krawczynski of The Athletic, the Minnesota Timberwolves will be among the first NBA teams to take part in the Mayo Clinic’s study for antibodies.

Casey Holdahl, a beat writer for the Portland Trail Blazers, followed that up by indicating that they have already started the process.

This could be groundbreaking for both the sports world and the rest of society. Tracing is a huge component of overcoming this global pandemic. Potential immunity is, too.

As it relates to the Wolves, they’ve already felt the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic first-hand following the death of Karl-Anthony Towns’ mother from the virus last month.