The NCAA eclipsed $1 billion in revenue for the 2017 fiscal year, marking the first time in history the association has reached this financial pinnacle. Steve Berkowitz of USA Today shared the NCAA’s release of its audited financial statement on Wednesday.

“A little more than half of the growth from 2016 came from increases in TV and marketing fees, revenue from championship events and investment income. The remainder — more than $26 million — came from the NCAA’s sale of its interest in an enterprise that, according to the financial statement, helps athletics departments and sports leagues with scheduling, referee assignments and various payments.”

The association ended up paying out just over $956 million, with $560.3 million going to Division I members. All told, the NCAA had a $105.1 million operating surplus last year, which left it with “just under $399 million in total net assets as of Aug. 31, 2017,” per the report.



This information surely doesn’t hurt the argument that college athletes should receive some sort of financial compensation (aside from their tuition, room and board) for helping the NCAA rake in a billion-plus.

Jesse Reed
Managing Editor at Sportsnaut. Featured on Yardbarker and MSN.com, and formerly was a breaking news writer/NFL analyst for Bleacher Report.