Jets News
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The New York and New Jersey regions have been the hardest hit of the COVID-19 pandemic currently plaguing the United States.

These two states currently represent a combined 40% of COVID-19 cases in the United States. It’s been an incredibly difficult past few months for the region.

Leave it to the NFL’s New York Jets to do their part once again. The team announced on Thursday that it is going to donate another $2 million in cold hard cash to help fight against the pandemic in the states of New York and New Jersey.

“On behalf of my family and the Jets, we would like to extend our support to these organizations who battle daily against an unprecedented challenge,” Jets CEO Christopher Johnson said, via the team’s official website. “No region in the country has been affected by COVID-19 more than ours and because of that, our resolve has only grown. These organizations continue to nourish the vulnerable and target the needs of those on our front lines. At no time has being a good teammate ever mattered more.”

The Jets had previously donated $1 million to multiple United Way charities to help combat the pandemic. This time, the donation will focus primarily on food insecurity, first responders and others in need within the region.

The NFL, its players and teams continue to step up in a big way to help fight the growing COVID-19 pandemic in the United States.

That will continue during the three-day NFL Draft starting Thursday evening.

If there’s one thing we have learned during these most difficult of times, it’s that we’re all in this together. The Jets are making that statement in more ways than one.

Vincent Frank
Editor here at Sportsnaut. Contributor at Forbes. Previous bylines include Bleacher Report, Yahoo!, SB Nation. Heard on ESPN Radio and NBC Sports Radio. Northern California native living it up in Las Vegas. The Keto lifestyle. Traveler. Reader. TV watcher. Dog daddy. Sam Malone = greatest TV character ever. "Carpe diem. Seize the day, boys. Make your lives extraordinary," John Keating.