NFL

Pete Carroll oblivious to Seahawks’ offensive line struggles

Michael Dixon
Written by Michael Dixon

When it came to protecting Russell Wilson in their Week 1 game against the Green Bay Packers, the Seattle Seahawks struggled and struggled mightily. So, what did coach Pete Carroll see when looking at the game film?

“That we got better during the game, that we protected much better as the game went on,” Carroll said, per Brady Henderson, ESPN. “Right out of the chutes we just missed a couple opportunities to do things and made a couple of mistakes, errors that we had. And also I give it to [Mike] Daniels. He played a heck of a football game and he gave us some problems. We didn’t deal with him as well as we thought we would.”

Henderson also added that “According to ESPN Stats & Information, Russell Wilson faced pressure on 44 percent (14 of 32) of his dropbacks Sunday. His career average from 2012-16 was 37 percent, highest in the NFL.”

If Carroll wants to put the positive spin on it for the public, fine. The bottom line is that this offensive line struggled all game in Green Bay. The proof is in the pudding. The Seahawks finished the game with only three field goals for nine points, kicking one each in the second, third, and fourth quarters.

It would be a lot easier to roll with what Carroll said, except that this problem plagued Seattle throughout 2016, as well. The Seahawks did very little to improve the line in the offseason and George Fant, one of the players who was supposed to take a step forward, is lost for the season due to a preseason injury. With that in mind, it’s hard to share in his optimism.

Protecting Wilson better will be vital if Seattle is going to contend in 2017. Carroll may have liked what he saw as Week 1’s game went on but for the rest of the year, the protection will need to be markedly better.

About the author

Michael Dixon

Michael Dixon

Bay Area born and raised, I have extensive experience in both the print and online worlds. There are few things in this world I love doing more than talking sports.